Latest News

Video shows Colo. officer fatally shooting man who tried to run down officers

PoliceOne - Thu, 11/09/2017 - 10:07

By Chhun Sun The Gazette (Colorado Springs, Colo.)

PUEBLO, Colo. — The Pueblo Police Department on Wednesday released footage of a fatal officer-involved shooting of a man who attempted to run officers down with his car.

The video shows a Feb. 5 shooting that killed Andrew Byrd, 35, who backed his vehicle into a patrol car before driving at other officers in the area of Small and Acero avenues just after midnight, police said. Officer Neal Robinson fired one round into the driver's side of a Toyota Camry, killing Byrd, police said.

Hours earlier, a woman reported that her 2005 Lexus sedan was stolen by Byrd, a known gang member with active warrants for his arrest, police said. He then returned to the neighborhood in a Camry.

A shootout followed that resulted in Byrd's death, police said. The video shows the Camry was stuck underneath a semi-truck before backing out and hitting a patrol car.

Robinson and fellow officer Bernadette Lambert were placed on paid administrative leave. In August, the Pueblo County District Attorney's Office ruled the shooting justified.

According to police, Robinson said he felt his life was in danger when he saw Byrd reaching for a possible weapon and driving toward him.

In a police report, Bernadette fired a shot at "Mr. Byrd based partially on her belief that he had shot Officer Robinson."

©2017 The Gazette (Colorado Springs, Colo.)


Categories: Latest News

Quiz: How much do you know about UCR and NIBRS reporting?

PoliceOne - Thu, 11/09/2017 - 09:30

Sponsored by Caliber Public Safety

By PoliceOne BrandFocus Staff

Police work is increasingly data-driven, and the FBI is working to get more agencies on board with its UCR and NIBRS reporting efforts so that crime data can be shared nationwide.

How does your knowledge of UCR and NIBRS stack up? Is your agency compliant? Take the quiz below and compare your scores to other PoliceOne readers.


Categories: Latest News

Share your data and search other agencies’ records with this tool

PoliceOne - Thu, 11/09/2017 - 09:30

Sponsored by Caliber Public Safety

By PoliceOne BrandFocus Staff

Access to investigative data often means the difference between solving a case and watching it go cold. Insight into the information gathered by other police agencies can provide a tremendous advantage and fuel more thorough investigations and, ultimately, more convictions.

Imagine being able to access potentially crime-solving law enforcement data from multiple agencies, both in and out of your state, with a single login. Caliber Public Safety offers agencies access to its proprietary data sharing network, InterDEx, as an added benefit when an agency deploys any of Caliber’s mobile, CAD or Online RMS products.

What is InterDEx?

The Caliber InterDEx Network is a nationwide data-sharing network that enables participating agencies to easily and securely share data and exchange instant messages with other users from hundreds of connected agencies. Access to data through this network increases agency interoperability and investigative reach, as well as improving officer safety.

The network was developed in the early 2000s after the 9/11 attacks highlighted a lack of information-sharing mechanisms across law enforcement agencies. Around that time, Caliber engineers set out to satisfy requirements put forth by three neighboring police agencies in Massachusetts. All three agencies were utilizing the same records management software provided by another vendor and wanted the ability to share their RMS data with each other.

Through some custom code and a VPN connection, the first iteration of Caliber’s data-sharing network was created. The company soon began working with agencies in Oklahoma and Arkansas and recognized the potential for a nationwide data-sharing network as clients shared success stories of apprehending criminals and solving cases using the added information.

As more agencies joined the network and data sources from various vendors were added, Caliber shifted from VPN connectivity to a partnership with the Nlets justice and public safety network to host the secure data hub.

Today, InterDEx (short for “interstate data exchange network”) users can query suspects, vehicle and property details from more than 400 participating agencies across 40 states, from all levels of government, offering over 200 different data sources including proprietary local systems as well as third-party vendor records systems, with new types being added regularly. The data from these disparate systems is standardized so that officers can assimilate it quickly to make informed tactical decisions.

Each agency’s data stays in the local system and is queried automatically by participating agencies, meaning local jurisdictions maintain custody of the data without sending it anywhere. Each agency retains full control of its data and determines how much detail will be shared outside of their organization, so local information always remains safe and secure. Settings can be easily changed simultaneously with agency policies as priorities shift.

Tap Into Multiple Information Sources

The Caliber InterDEx network acts as a hub that can save investigators valuable time because they don’t need to log in and out of multiple systems to query different sources. Participants can search for data across the entire network with a single login. Returns on queries arrive in a matter of seconds, and the returns are ranked based on relevance to the original query.

“One search means that you are ‘one and done,’” said Blair Robinson, Caliber executive vice president. “There is no need to search multiple databases and make phone calls across county lines – it’s all right there at your fingertips.”

InterDEx doesn’t merely facilitate agencies sharing their RMS data. With an average exchange of more than 600,000 messages travelling across state lines each day, participants in InterDEx can share and search information far beyond what NCIC databases return.

NCIC provides data on individuals’ criminal history after an arrest, such as warrants or criminal charges. InterDEx searches law enforcement data that may not be part of the court process, such as field interview cards, traffic stop details, incident reports, suspect descriptions with identifying details, license plates, vehicle descriptions and last known addresses. These details provide actionable information that supports effective enforcement and investigations.

The network provides additional insight by delivering “Matching Recent Inquiries” (MRI) information so that when an officer initiates a query on name, driver’s license, vehicle tag or VIN, InterDEx reports all recent queries made on that identifier by any users from other connected agencies. Combined with the instant messaging capabilities, the system allows officers to see the availability of other officers in nearby jurisdictions in order to communicate directly and share valuable insights.

Participating agencies have shared numerous success stories about how InterDEx has helped them solve crimes. For example, officers along the I-40 corridor, which runs from North Carolina to California, reported being able to apprehend a wanted sex offender within hours after an MRI result showed that his plate had been run during a traffic stop in another county. In another case, a sheriff’s deputy was able to quickly discover that a young woman reported missing was being detained for DUI in another jurisdiction, based on a driver’s license query made the previous night.

“The power of the data sharing is the key component,” said Robinson. “With InterDEx, individuals can literally connect the dots, which in turn assists with more logical crime fighting. When agencies are connected, they have a much better chance of finding that needle in the haystack than they would otherwise.”


Categories: Latest News

5 ways agencies can report and collaborate more effectively using an RMS platform

PoliceOne - Thu, 11/09/2017 - 09:30

Sponsored by Caliber Public Safety

By PoliceOne BrandFocus Staff

Law enforcement agencies rely heavily on records management systems to support day-to-day operations. An efficient RMS includes not just the software to electronically collect, organize and store secure information, it will also afford administrators, investigators and officers in the field intuitive ways to effectively navigate copious amounts of sensitive data.

When you’re trying to solve a case, system delays, network failures, awkward user interfaces and disparate systems that don’t work together can be frustrating and consume hours of each shift. This results in less time on patrol, which is a disservice to the community.

Law enforcement agencies need software tools that are reliable, responsive and effective. An RMS that integrates multiple systems, improves data quality, complies with reporting standards and that can be accessed by officers from multiple devices provides efficient access to data and allows officers more time out in the community to do their jobs.

Caliber Public Safety provides a variety of software options for law enforcement. Online RMS, its flagship RMS, is a web-based product that provides secure access anytime, anywhere from any internet-enabled device running a modern web browser. It is designed to be secure, reliable, CJIS-compliant and conform to national reporting requirements.

Here are five ways the Online RMS from Caliber makes it easy for officers, dispatchers and investigators to enter and share critical information.

1. Mobile Operation

Caliber’s Online RMS can be securely accessed from any location connected to the internet, at any time. Mobile data access provides flexibility that allows officers more time in the field, as they are not tethered to the in-office network for system access to look up data or finish reports at the end of shift.

Real-time data on the go also supplies officers on patrol with current information for enhanced situational awareness and improved safety, says Blair Robinson, executive vice president of Caliber Public Safety.

2. Security and Reliability

Caliber’s Online RMS is hosted in secure facilities in the Nlets justice and public safety network, which is dedicated to the exchange of law enforcement, criminal justice and public safety information nationwide. The Nlets facilities meet strict FBI CJIS policies and maintain redundant network paths and a disaster recovery site to protect data and ensure continuous operations.

As a hosted offering, Online RMS grants all user agencies access to the latest version of the software at all times without having to worry about updates. Program improvements, repairs and updates are deployed automatically each month to ensure an evergreen platform with no additional costs.

3. No Need to Pay for IT infrastructure

Because Online RMS runs on a completely online cloud platform, agencies are not required to install, update or maintain software. Agencies share high-performance servers for cost savings and don’t have to worry about budgeting for IT expertise or physical management of in-house data storage servers, says Robinson. Each agency has complete independent control of administration, configuration and user access privileges.

Continuous operation is a critical capability for law enforcement software, and Caliber’s cloud platform ensures fault tolerance. This means the system as a whole continues to operate even in the event of isolated problems in the hardware or software so that agencies can depend on consistent access to their data 24/7.

4. UCR/NIBRS Compliance

The Caliber Online RMS system offers an intuitive and user-friendly interface for completing incident reports. Easy-to-read icons and an incident reporting wizard provide guidance and help ensure consistent reporting and NIBRS/UCR compliance. The wizard eliminates guesswork for officers on what NIBRS elements are required for each offense and walks the officer through the reporting process, collecting details about suspects, victims, vehicles, property, drugs, weapons and other items.

The wizard is configurable to meet state-specific NIBRS variations and offers agencies the ability to define additional required fields and validations, says Robinson. The system improves data entry and quality by detecting potential audit warnings for correction prior to submission to the FBI or state NIBRS programs. The platform also provides trend reports and visual aids to support crime analysis and operational efficiency.

5. Interoperability and Data-sharing

Too often, incident report data is locked down in individual agency systems and not shared for the greater good of identifying suspects and solving crimes. Online RMS is one of a suite of platforms Caliber offers to serve public safety organizations and improve agency interoperability by removing the barriers to sharing data.

Through Caliber’s SmartSearch capability, agencies can search their own data as well as shareable incident report data, including narratives, from other Online RMS clients within the same state. This helps these agencies better connect the dots and improve crime fighting.

Harold C. Rodgers Jr., chief of the McCordsville Police Department in Indiana, credited Caliber’s data-sharing products in helping solve what seemed like an unsolvable crime.

“Prior to having Caliber Public Safety Online RMS, the solving of this criminal activity would have taken much longer, if it was capable of being solved at all,” Rodgers said. “Agencies rarely have immediate access to each other’s information and reports without writing out lengthy requests and long delays. The SmartSearch database within Caliber Online RMS made information otherwise available, but unknown, readily available at the detective’s fingertips.”

Additionally, users have access to Caliber’s nationwide InterDEx data sharing network that enables participating agencies to easily and securely share their RMS data, according to each agency’s own selected permissions. Users can query suspects, vehicle and property details from more than 400 participating agencies across 40 states, from all levels of government, plus an additional 200 external data sources.

This data-sharing capacity enables multiagency collaboration and boosts situational awareness by helping dispatchers, responders and commanders interact in real time across agency disciplines and location boundaries.

“Instant awareness of RMS-related data from participating agencies across the country saves officers valuable time because they don’t need to log in and out of multiple systems to query different sources,” said Robinson.

Data collected in police incident reports helps law enforcement agencies identify, track, prevent and solve crime, as well as keep the public informed to show that agencies are serving them to the fullest extent. A cloud-based RMS platform like Online RMS from Caliber Public Safety can help agencies trim costs, shorten response times, share and search data and ensure consistent reporting and NIBRS/UCR compliance.


Categories: Latest News

Ore. police respond to call for help, turns out to be a parrot

PoliceOne - Thu, 11/09/2017 - 07:54

Associated Press

CLACKAMAS, Ore. — A deliveryman in Oregon who heard a woman's screams for help had his wife call 911, but when a deputy showed up it turned out the screamer was a parrot, not a woman.

The Oregonian/OregonLive reported Tuesday that when Clackamas County Sheriff's Deputy Hayden Sanders showed up, all he found was Diego the Parrot.

The green-and-yellow bird was in good health and no humans were involved.

. @UPS driver heard someone yelling "help" inside house. Deputies responded and found the culprit. Thankfully Diego the Parrot was unharmed pic.twitter.com/e5BVG5B5AO

— Clackamas Sheriff (@ClackCoSheriff) November 7, 2017


Categories: Latest News

Mo. K-9 dies two days after fall from parking garage

PoliceOne - Thu, 11/09/2017 - 06:55

By Christine Byers St. Louis Post-Dispatch

NORMANDY, Mo. — Dozens of area police dogs and their handlers along with officers and firefighters said good-bye Wednesday to a 3-year-old German shepherd named Argo who died from injuries he suffered while on duty.

Normandy Officer Matt Miller and his dog Argo had just finished an accident investigation along Interstate 70 on Sunday when a hail storm moved in. Miller sought shelter inside a parking garage on the University of Missouri-St. Louis campus as officers in his department typically do to avoid damage to their cars, said Sgt. Tim Conner, Normandy canine supervisor.

Miller believes the storm spooked Argo, and he let the dog out of his car to calm him down. Suddenly, the dog ran toward a wall where hail could be heard slamming on the other side. The wall deceivingly looked to be level with the ground but was actually about four stories above ground, Conner said.

“We don’t know if he tried to jump the wall thinking someone was over there or just to see what was over there,” Conner said. “But that’s like being hit by a car-head on at 40 mph.”

Initially, vets told Miller that Argo suffered some broken ribs, a broken leg and a possibly punctured lung. He appeared to be improving, even standing on his back legs with his paws on a table at one point, Conner said. But his internal injuries worsened and he died about 10 minutes after his handler left him Tuesday night, Conner said.

Miller transferred to the Normandy police department in December 2016 after serving with Argo in Ferguson for about six months.

Argo could track suspects, search for drugs or other evidence and search buildings. He was most known for alerting officers to $150,000 inside a vehicle during a traffic stop because the money smelled of narcotics, Conner said.

He was one of two Normandy police dogs. Officers brought the department’s second dog, Toma, who started in March, to see Argo’s body Wednesday to say her goodbyes.

“She’s been whimpering ever since,” Conner said. “The idea is to let her see him so she knows and it gives her some closure,” Conner said.

A line of police and fire trucks escorted Argo’s remains from a vet’s office in Manchester to Baue Funeral Home at St. Charles Memorial Gardens on Wednesday. Some fire departments hung American flags from their ladders above overpasses along the route, much as they do during funerals for fallen first responders or veterans.

Dispatchers then gave Argo a final call out at the funeral home.

Normandy’s police canine unit is paid for by donations. A GoFundMe account started to pay for Argo’s medical expenses reached about $4,400 Wednesday.

The department plans to start raising money to get another dog, which can cost as much as $16,000, Conner said.

Conner said Miller is devastated by the death of his partner, as is the entire 31-officer department in north St. Louis County.

“These dogs are like our kids, and unfortunately we see them more than our families sometimes,” he said. “They fearlessly go into those dark places that we don’t want to go.

“Without fear.”

Humbled by the support the entire St. Louis community has shown. RIP K9 Argo. @Normandy_Police pic.twitter.com/sgHvDlIMqA

— Frank Mininni (@Normandy_Chief) November 8, 2017

©2017 the St. Louis Post-Dispatch


Categories: Latest News

Ill. State Police begin 'Silver Search' training

PoliceOne - Wed, 11/08/2017 - 15:19

Associated Press

SPRINGFIELD, Ill. — Illinois State Police officials have launched statewide training for officers in dealing with Alzheimer's disease patients who wander away and need to be found.

"Silver Search" training will continue for two years and involve 2,500 police officers and dispatchers. Informational cards will also be distributed to every officer.

State Police Director Leo Schmitz says the Silver Search curriculum includes warning signs to look for, communication skills and procedures for activating a Silver Search.

Research shows that 60 percent of those with Alzheimer's disease will wander at some point after their diagnosis.

An Endangered Missing Person Advisory alerts the public through highway signs and lottery terminals, the Silver Search website and social media.

A public awareness campaign will include radio and TV spots, billboards and social media announcements in English and Spanish.


Categories: Latest News

Police: Man shoots 2 Ga. officers; later found dead

PoliceOne - Wed, 11/08/2017 - 10:21

Associated Press

FOREST PARK, Ga. — Authorities say a man shot two police officers and was later found dead behind a home south of Atlanta.

Forest Park police Maj. Chris Matson told WSB-TV that Jacob Bailey's body was found behind a home in the city of Forest Park near where two police officers were shot Wednesday morning. Matson didn't say how Bailey died.

Forest Park police Sgt. Kelli Flanigan said both officers were in stable condition and their injuries were considered non-life-threatening.

Matson said Bailey got in a shootout with the officers when they tried to pull him over for reckless driving.

Forest Park Middle School on lockdown as police search for this man, identified as Jacob Bailey pic.twitter.com/zqfkfar4ho

— Christie Ethridge (@ChristieOnTV) November 8, 2017


Categories: Latest News

Officers who saved Dallas firefighter-paramedic's life earn Medals of Valor

PoliceOne - Wed, 11/08/2017 - 09:45

By Naheed Rajwani The Dallas Morning News

DALLAS — Police officers used a Dallas squad car as a makeshift ambulance earlier this year to rush a wounded paramedic to the hospital.

It was a bold, and probably lifesaving, move.

A shooter had killed his godfather before wounding his neighbor and firefighter-paramedic William An, who had come to their aid.

The first officers to arrive at the scene determined the neighbor would be OK. But An, who wasn't conscious, was in dire need of help. Officers dragged him into the back of a squad car and sped toward Baylor University Medical Center, risking their own lives to help save his.

Nine officers were awarded Medals of Valor from the Friends of Dallas Police on Monday night for the rescue. But six months later, they insist they were just doing their duty.

"I was doing my job, and the other officers that were with me, I know they would say the same thing," Sgt. Robert Watson, who led the response, said in an interview on Monday.

Organizers say the Friends of Dallas Police's annual banquet is like the Oscars for the city's officers, many of whom swap their police uniforms for suits and dresses for the evening.

This year's banquet, which was Chief U. Renee Hall's first Friends of Dallas Police banquet as chief, recognized 115 officers and civilians for their work.

"Law enforcement is extremely tough today," the chief said in a speech at the start of the ceremony. "It's tougher than it was when we began. Beyond the challenges, these officers that we are honoring today, each one of these individuals has set aside those challenges."

Watson works in the Dallas Police Department's crisis response team and is often called to active shooter calls that turn out to be a false alarm. He didn't know An personally before May, but he considered it his duty to help a fellow first responder.

An said Monday that he was touched by the support he's gotten from police and his fellow paramedics since he was shot.

"We're kind of like two sides of the same coin, you know?" An said.

A special night. My nephew received the Medal of Valor, the highest award given to a Dallas Police Officer. pic.twitter.com/rDSP7Xgphf

— ?? Lindy Rowland (@sono_grata) November 7, 2017

Watson and An met again during Monday's awards ceremony. This time, they had their families with them — the Watsons and their children, ages 9, 11 and 12, and the An family and their children, ages 4 and 3 weeks.

The 3-week-old is named Watson, which An's wife had picked out before the shooting. The couple realized later that it was the lifesaving sergeant's last name, too.

"Purely coincidental," An said, "but some people say there's no such thing as coincidences."

He still isn't sure how long his recovery will take, but he hopes to return to firefighting someday.

"My dream was to be a firefighter, not to be an admin or logistics," he said. "I want to be in the field, for sure."

Copyright 2017 Dallas Morning News


Categories: Latest News

Police: Pa. trooper saves own life with tourniquet

PoliceOne - Wed, 11/08/2017 - 08:09

Associated Press

BETHLEHEM, Pa. — A Pennsylvania State Police trooper who was shot several times during a traffic stop remained hospitalized in critical condition Wednesday as authorities released more details of the violent confrontation along a busy highway.

Cpl. Seth Kelly, a 13-year veteran, likely saved his own life by applying a tourniquet after he was hit by gunfire Tuesday morning in Plainfield Township, north of Philadelphia, state police Capt. Richard D'Ambrosio said at a news conference.

Kelly, 39, suffered wounds to his neck and shoulder area and to his leg in the close-quarters gunfight, and was set to undergo another surgery to remove a bullet.

"He's battling. He's certainly not out of the woods by any means, but ... he is a very strong individual and he displayed a will yesterday that he wanted to live and get through this," D'Ambrosio said.

The suspect, 22-year-old Daniel Khalil Clary, of Effort, faces charges that include attempted murder of a law enforcement officer and aggravated assault. Clary, who was shot and remains hospitalized, has given a statement to police.

"He's not denying his involvement," said Lt. Joseph F. Sokolofski.

Kelly was helping another trooper arrest Clary, whom they suspected of driving under the influence of marijuana, when Clary began fighting with the troopers, police said. The struggle lasted nearly two minutes, and at one point all three men were "wrestling and rolling around" the right lane of busy Route 33 as cars and trucks whizzed by them on the left, D'Ambrosio said.

Despite being hit with a stun gun, Clary managed to break free, retrieved a semi-automatic pistol from his car and opened fire on Kelly and Trooper Ryan Seiple, authorities said. Both troopers returned fire, hitting Clary several times. Clary then fled, driving himself to a hospital where he was taken into custody.

Seiple, 31, received a minor injury during the scuffle but was not shot. Officials credited emergency medical workers at the scene and staff at St. Luke's Hospital in Fountain Hill, where Kelly was flown, for saving his life.

Officials are awaiting the results of a blood test to see what Clary had in his system.

Northampton County District Attorney John Morganelli said Wednesday he will seek a "very, very, very long jail sentence" for Clary.


Categories: Latest News

2 Calif. officers end nearly 30-year partnership

PoliceOne - Wed, 11/08/2017 - 07:49

By Cinday Chang Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — The cops have patrolled together for more than 28 years, one behind the wheel, the other riding shotgun, scanning the streets of northeast Los Angeles for signs of trouble.

Both are bald with mustaches, as set in their ways as a married couple. Duarte, the smoother talker, is first to approach a suspect or defuse a tense situation. Marinelli, whose “aw shucks” demeanor masks a sly wit, hangs back to stand guard.

They are friendly or fearsome, depending on what they think you deserve. Homeless people and street vendors get a pass. Car thieves do not. Their adversaries call them Los Dobermans, the Doublemint Twins, Heckle and Jeckle.

In the Los Angeles Police Department, partners typically last a year or two in the same car. Sometimes, working styles clash. More often, someone gets transferred or promoted. A decade together is long, three unheard of.

Patrolling in Cypress Park on a late afternoon last fall, they recall the tragedy and mayhem they have seen on these streets. They point to the alley where Marinelli fatally shot an armed man in 1993. Around the corner on Bank Street two years later, a 3-year-old girl was killed by gang members.

This is one of the last days Harold Marinelli and J.C. Duarte will work together. Marinelli is leaving for knee surgery, then retirement.

“I’m always right, and he’s always wrong,” Marinelli says.

“I always let him think he’s right — just like my wife,” Duarte responds.

In June 1988, when the two young police officers climbed into a black-and-white for the first time, their chemistry was immediate. They were the same kind of cop, itching for a caper, obsessed with catching car thieves. No need for promotions or to check out other stations. All they wanted was to work Northeast Division together.

Supervisors tried to break them up. They resisted. Once, they joined a vice squad to avoid being paired with novice cops. When they returned to patrol, they took a demotion, losing two stripes and 5% of their pay to stay together.

Spending all day, every day cooped up in a car with the wrong person can be hellish. One officer wants to run after a suspect while the other insists on summoning reinforcements. One may power through a whole shift without a break, while the other gets cranky without his customary burger stop. In a dangerous situation, partners move in an improvised choreography, wordlessly reading each other’s intentions.

“If you don’t gel, you can hardly wait for that day to get done,” says Jack Richter, a sergeant in media relations, whose longest pairing lasted two years.

Like a good marriage, a good police partnership can thrive off differences. Duarte, 53, speaks Spanish and is better at writing reports. Marinelli, 58, is the quiet one who notices the detail others miss — the one that leads to the bad guy.

Duarte is a meticulous record-keeper, jotting down every hour of overtime the partners have worked. A black binder holds mug shots of every person they have arrested — page after page of scowling photographs, a rogues’ gallery of northeast Los Angeles.

There was the suspected robber who led them on a car chase in 1998; the woman they arrested almost a dozen times for drug offenses in the early 2000s before she turned her life around; the boxer known as “Eddie the Animal,” whose freedom ended when the partners spotted him in Highland Park on Jan. 3, 2006, and arrested him on a burglary and robbery warrant.

At the station, they are the Baldies, who pepper roll calls with jokes and are admired for their old-fashioned “obs skills” — the ability to size up a situation at a glance.

A few years ago, the partners were driving around Cypress Park, looking to pick up some overtime, when they spotted a man molesting his niece in a parked car. They later took the girl to Disneyland.

Before their second-to-last shift together, Duarte produces a worn, folded paper from his shirt pocket — a list of suspects wanted for crimes ranging from drinking in public to carjacking. They hardly need the list. They know the career criminals, and the criminals know them. Through a combination of cajoling, joking and toughness, they have forged wary but friendly ties.

“We have a decent relationship with everyone on that list,” Duarte says.

They chased Alan Ferguson for years. Now, Alan Jr. is on the list. Same goes for Nick Placentia Sr. and Jr. One of their most-wanted has been homeless for nearly 30 years.

They know who the suspects are dating, where they buy their beer — where they are likely to be.

In 2005, Duarte was patrolling solo and stopped in a parking lot to do some paperwork. He glanced up and saw a woman wanted as an accomplice to a murder. He knew her from the days when she was homeless and using drugs. He addressed her by name.

“Hey, Kerry, how are you? I’d like to talk to you, but I need to put handcuffs on you first,” he remembers saying as he arrested her.

As they drive across the Metro train tracks in Highland Park, they reminisce about a recent encounter there.

A man on the train was suspected of stealing a cellphone. They positioned their car to block the train, which was moving slowly before it stopped.?????? The man ran, and Duarte wrestled him down on the tracks.

The victim got her phone back, and the suspect went to jail. Duarte hurt his knee and missed months of work.

“We don’t charge over multiple fences anymore, but we’re still as eager and anxious to make that outstanding arrest, to catch that car thief,” Duarte says.

In their patrol SUV, papers containing details on suspects and stolen cars are jammed into the passenger side sun visor. An automatic license plate reader pings like ice cubes clinking in a glass.

On his right hip, Duarte’s gun flashes in a gleam of silver. It is a six-shot revolver, a relic from generations ago.

The streets are not as rough as they once were. A rainy Sunday can go by without a single 911 call. Rents are up. The new residents are more likely to pay $8 for a fresh squeezed juice than to gang bang.

For a few hours each day, they walk a foot beat between Avenues 50 and 60 on Figueroa Street. They remember when La Cuevita, a Mexican-themed lounge, was Richard’s Hofbrau and attracted members of the Vagos motorcycle club.

The liquor store with the landmark “Coldest Beer in Town” sign recently became a high-end deli. The shelves are stacked with kale chips, wheat crackers and organic bourbon. A roast beef sandwich with yuzu kosho dressing sells for $15.

Duarte and Marinelli have been dropping by the liquor store since 1997. But they are not wedded to the past.

“I like the way Fig is going,” Marinelli says to the new owner.

Back on Figueroa, they greet a homeless man with wild hair.

“Your feet are pretty clean for being barefoot,” Marinelli says.

The man makes an observation of his own, pointing to the six stripes on Marinelli’s sleeve. Each represents five years on the force, Marinelli explains.

“Wow, I respect that. I bet you’ve seen some [things],” the man says, using a profanity.

They used to reward themselves with a cinnamon roll for each stolen car arrest, until they racked up 14.

“We stopped that destructive tradition,” Duarte says.

But a treat is still in order, Marinelli says. “Ice cream?”

“Italian doughnuts,” Duarte suggests.

“Let’s change the subject. You’re killing me,” Marinelli responds.

They have stuck to the same routine for over two decades.

Tuesdays: their favorite taco truck in Eagle Rock. Wednesdays: split pea soup at Astro. Thursdays: pizza at Palermo’s.

Their home lives are as stable as their work partnership.

Duarte has been married for 30 years, Marinelli for 28. Each man has two grown daughters. They own dogs from the same litter. Both favor Hawaiian shirts on special occasions.

Marinelli always had a mustache. Duarte eventually grew one. First Duarte shaved his head, then Marinelli followed suit.

“I was going bald anyway. I save so much money on hairspray,” Marinelli says.

They are a dying breed — cops who worked the 1992 L.A. riots, before some rookies were born, who used the now-forbidden chokehold to subdue suspects, who lived by their wits, not by computerized deployment plans.

“I’m still doing the same thing — playing cops and robbers, getting the bad guy. All I ever wanted to do was work the street,” Marinelli says.

Marinelli has no second thoughts about the fatal shooting in Cypress Park more than 20 years ago. The 26-year-old man pointed a handgun at him, and “it was either him or me.”

“The rule is you go home alive,” Marinelli says.

While their peers graduated to desk jobs and higher salaries, the partners stayed put. In their world, the street cop reigns supreme.

“You do this job, you either like it or you don’t,” Duarte says. “The people who don’t like it promote.”

To the end, Duarte and Marinelli remain as hungry as ever. Their technique involves a dose of obsession — a daylong stakeout for a car thief, or driving by a stolen vehicle five or six times to capture a suspect.

“They’re the last of how old-fashioned police work was done — not new technology or gadgets but years of field training and observation,” says Gina Paialii, a senior lead officer in Northeast Division.

Capt. Arturo Sandoval, who leads the division, has known the partners since he was a sergeant there in the 2000s. In their last year together, they are still among the hardest working officers at the station and among the leaders in arrests. Their commendations for arresting car thieves number in the hundreds.

“They could have been detectives, sergeants, all of that,” Sandoval says. “They were happy just working Northeast, especially as partners.”

At Marinelli’s retirement party in March, Duarte emcees in a “Los Dobermans” baseball jersey.

A cartoon of the partners, titled “The Los Angeles Police Department’s Longest Working Partners ‘Ever,’” lists some of their achievements in recent years: 16 homicide arrests, 76 robbery arrests, 199 grand theft auto arrests. There is no official confirmation that they have been together the longest. But LAPD veterans are hard-pressed to name a partnership that lasted more than a decade or so.

Cmdr. Bob Lopez, one of their supervisors in the early 1990s, wanted to break them up so each could train a younger officer. They fled to vice. Lopez now admits he was mistaken.

“I realized their partnership was magic,” he says.

Duarte will finish his career next year. In the meantime, he has a new partner.

©2017 the Los Angeles Times


Categories: Latest News

Canada officer killed in shootout with suspect

PoliceOne - Wed, 11/08/2017 - 07:28

By PoliceOne Staff

ABBOTSFORD, B.C., Canada — A Canadian police officer was killed during a shootout with a suspect that occured at a strip mall on Monday.

The Vancouver Sun reports that Abbotsford PD Const. John Davidson was hit during a shootout at the mall’s parking lot and died shortly after arriving at the hospital. Abbotsford Police Chief Bob Rich hailed the officer’s actions.

“The officer who gave his life today is a hero,” Rich said. “He was protecting this community."

The shooting started when police received a call about a stolen vehicle being spotted in the mall’s parking lot. The suspect, who has been identified as 65-year-old Oscar Arfmann, reportedly came into a car dealership Saturday and asked to test drive a black Ford Mustang before taking off with it.

The dealership's fleet manager said one of his employees spotted the car and attempted to block it while waiting for police to arrive when the suspect “came back with a rifle and decided he wanted the car back.”

Police arrived and exchanged gunfire with the gunman when Davidson was hit. He was rushed to the hospital where he was pronounced dead. Arfmann fled in the vehicle and was pursued by police before he was eventually apprehended.

Arfmann has been charged with first-degree murder, Global News Canada reports.


Categories: Latest News

Police: Md. officer shot driver who was ramming vehicle

PoliceOne - Tue, 11/07/2017 - 15:33

Associated Press

SILVER SPRING, Md. — Authorities say a police officer in suburban Washington shot and wounded an SUV driver who had been ramming a vehicle that someone else was in.

Police in Montgomery County, Maryland, said in a statement that a man called 911 Sunday evening, saying someone was ramming his car with an SUV at a Silver Spring shopping center.

Police say a responding officer shot the unidentified SUV driver. The driver was taken to a hospital in serious condition. No other injuries were reported.

Investigators did not immediately release the races or identities of those involved in the shooting.

Police say the officer has been with the department for 10 years and, per standard procedure, is on paid administrative leave as the shooting is investigated.

It is unclear what prompted the initial altercation.


Categories: Latest News

Md. police launch plainclothes 'decoy unit' after robberies and assaults by youths

PoliceOne - Tue, 11/07/2017 - 14:53

By Jessica Anderson The Baltimore Sun

BALTIMORE — The Baltimore police department has created a plainclothes unit of young officers and increased uniformed patrols in response to recent crimes by juveniles in South Baltimore.

Commissioner Kevin Davis announced the plainclothes decoy unit Monday night during a monthly public safety walk held by the Riverside Neighborhood Association, which drew more than 200 residents to Riverside Park after several recent robberies and assaults involving juveniles were reported in the area.

The new unit will be made up of young, trained police officers deployed to specific areas where there's violent, repeat juvenile offenders, Davis said. The department has also doubled the number of officers assigned full time to South Baltimore neighborhoods and increased holiday deployments with administrative sworn officers in neighborhoods near the Inner Harbor, he said. The recent police academy class is also walking in the area.

"For the rest of the year, you will see an enhanced police presence, and that is not going to go away,” Davis said as the crowd applauded.

Councilman Eric T. Costello, who represents the neighborhood, said the recent crimes, which include juveniles assaulting victims with wooden boards and bats are “completely unacceptable.”

One woman who was attacked by several juveniles with wooden boards on Halloween night attended the walk. She still had black eyes and large bandages over her knees.

“I think it’s good people want to make a change. I don’t know if it will happen,” she said. She declined to give her name.

Her boyfriend, Jeff Brown, who lives in the neighborhood, said her attack and the attention given to her case “really put a lot of energy into stopping this.”

Police said a 15-year-old has been charged in four of seven incidents on Halloween.

Davis said much of the recent juvenile crime in the area is caused by several known offenders.

"We have a number of juveniles who have introduced themselves to this community,” Davis said. “They are small in numbers but they have committed the same crime again, again and again. We've arrested them again, again and again. We just have to hold onto them, detain them until they change their behavior."

Davis said he had the records of 10 juveniles who were recently arrested pulled and found that collectively, the groups has been previously charged with more than 60 offenses.

While the department has beefed up patrols in the area, Davis said there needs to be more accountability by the courts, at home and in school. He said many juvenile offenders also likely come from troubled backgrounds.

One resident asked what’s causing the crime trend.

"They probably think that nobody gives a damn about them,” Davis responded. But also, he said “because they think they can get away with it."

Lisa Urso and her husband Matthew have lived in the neighbohood for eight years and have noticed an increase in crime. The couple said they regularly attend crime walks, but Monday was by far the largest. They haven’t been victimized but said they have known people in the community who have.

Matthew Urso said he doesn’t want the recent incidents to deter people from moving to the neighborhood where he and his wife have decided to make their home and raise their two daughters. He said the health of the neighborhood and others are important to the future of the city, and “you can’t let a neighborhood with a tax base fall apart.”

Resident James Gray, a civil engineer, said until recently he never thought twice about visitors walking to his house from a parking space.

“Now it’s like, don’t walk alone at night at all,” he said. He hopes the momentum from Monday night will continue.

©2017 The Baltimore Sun


Categories: Latest News

Va. officer in critical but stable condition after being shot by teen

PoliceOne - Tue, 11/07/2017 - 12:25

By PoliceOne Staff

PORTSMOUTH, Va. — A Virginia police officer is in critical but stable condition after she was shot by a juvenile suspect Monday afternoon.

WVEC reports that the Portsmouth officer got out of surgery and is in stable condition after being shot multiple times. Police took the 15-year-old male suspect into custody a short time after the shooting.

Police said the officer encountered the teenager after he was reported to be a runaway. The officer was attempting to detain him when the suspect shot her. She was rushed to a local hospital.

The suspect was later found with the officer’s handcuffs on his wrist.

Charges against the suspect are currently pending.


Categories: Latest News

Man charged in collision that led to SC trooper's death

PoliceOne - Tue, 11/07/2017 - 10:34

By Noah Feit The State (Columbia, S.C.)

GREENVILLE COUNTY, S.C. — The Simpsonville man involved in a traffic collision that resulted in the death of a South Carolina Highway Patrol trooper has been charged with a crime by the Greenville County Sheriff’s Office Monday.

Tuan Quoc Trinh, 33, has been charged with Failure to Maintain Lane, according to multiple reports that said he fell asleep before the collision.

Trooper Daniel Keith Rebman, Jr. died after his patrol vehicle was struck while he was on duty early in the morning on Oct. 24. Rebman, who lived in Taylors, died of blunt force trauma, Greenville County Coroner Parks Evans said.

Rebman, 31, was stationary in his patrol vehicle in the emergency lane of I-385 near Bridges Road when his Ford Taurus Patrol car was struck from behind by Trinh’s pick-up truck around 12:23 a.m., according to the South Carolina Department of Public Safety.

Deputies say Trinh’s 2003 Dodge Ram pickup truck was traveling at 66 mph in a 65 mph zone when drifted out of the lane of traffic and hit the back of Rebman’s vehicle, according to wyff4.com.

An investigation indicated that Trinh fell asleep right before the collision, according to wspa.com.

Deputies administered field sobriety tests on Trihn and didn’t find any evidence of impairment, according to wyff4.com.

Funeral services for Rebman were held on Oct.29 and he was laid to rest at Woodlawn Cemetery. Rebman is survived by his wife, Michelle, and three young daughters – Olivia, Charlee, and Kennedy.

Members from more than 15 state patrols from as far away as California came to pay their respects along with hundreds of state and local officers.

©2017 The State (Columbia, S.C.)


Categories: Latest News

Texas gunman checked each aisle, shot babies at point-blank range

PoliceOne - Tue, 11/07/2017 - 09:55

By Jim Vertuno, Will Weissert and Paul J. Weber Associated Press

SUTHERLAND SPRINGS, Texas — The gunman who killed 26 people at a small-town Texas church went aisle to aisle looking for victims and shot crying babies at point-blank range, a couple who survived the attack said.

Rosanne Solis and Joaquin Ramirez were sitting near the entrance to the First Baptist Church on Sunday when they heard what sounded like firecrackers and realized someone was shooting at the tiny wood-frame building.

In an interview with San Antonio television station KSAT, Solis said congregants began screaming and dropped to the floor. She could see bullets flying into the carpet and fellow worshippers falling down, bloodied, after getting hit.

For a moment, the attacked seemed to stop, and worshippers thought that police had arrived to confront the gunman. But then he entered the church and resumed "shooting hard" at helpless families, Solis said.

The gunman checked each aisle for more victims, including babies who cried out amid the noise and smoke, Ramirez said.

The couple survived by huddling close to the ground and playing dead. Solis was shot in the arm. Ramirez was hit by shrapnel.

About 20 other people were wounded. Investigators collected at least 15 empty magazines that held 30 rounds each at the scene, suggesting the assailant fired at least 450 rounds.

The gunman, Devin Patrick Kelley, had a history of domestic violence that spanned years before the attack and was able buy weapons because the Air Force did not submit his criminal history to the FBI as required by military rules.

If Kelley's past offenses had been properly shared, they would have prevented him from buying a gun, the Air Force acknowledged Monday.

Investigators also revealed that Kelley had sent threatening text messages to his mother-in-law, a member of the church, before the attack, and that sheriff's deputies had responded to a domestic violence call in 2014 at his home involving a girlfriend who became his second wife.

Later that year, he was formally ousted from the Air Force for a 2012 assault on his ex-wife in which he choked her and struck her son hard enough to fracture his skull.

At a news conference in South Korea, President Donald Trump was asked if he would support "extreme vetting" for gun purchases in the same way he has called for "extreme vetting" for people entering the country. Trump responded by saying stricter gun control measures might have led to more deaths in the shooting because a bystander who shot at the gunman would not have been armed.

"If he didn't have a gun, instead of having 26 dead, you would have had hundreds more dead," Trump said.

In the tiny town of Sutherland Springs, population 400, grieving townspeople reeled from their losses. The dead ranged from 18 months to 77 years old and included multiple members of some families.

"Our church was not comprised of members or parishioners. We were a very close family," said the pastor's wife Sherri Pomeroy, who, like her husband, was out of town when the attack happened. "Now most of our church family is gone."

The couple's 14-year-old daughter, Annabelle Pomeroy, was among those killed.

Kelley's mother-in-law sometimes attended services there, but the sheriff said she was not at church Sunday.

The massacre appeared to stem from a domestic situation and was not racially or religiously motivated, Texas Department of Public Safety Regional Director Freeman Martin said. He did not elaborate.

Based on evidence at the scene, investigators believe Kelley died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound after he was chased by bystanders, one of whom was armed, and crashed his car.

The 26-year-old shooter also used his cellphone to tell his father he had been shot and did not think he would survive, authorities said.

While in the military, Kelley served in logistics readiness at Holloman Air Force Base in New Mexico from 2010 until his 2014 discharge, Air Force spokeswoman Ann Stefanek said.

He was discharged for the assault involving his previous wife and her child and had served a year of confinement after a court-martial. Under Pentagon rules, information about convictions of military personnel for crimes such as assault should be submitted to the FBI's Criminal Justice Investigation Services Division.

Stefanek said the service is launching a review of its handling of the case and taking a comprehensive look at its databases to ensure other cases have been reported correctly.

A few months before he received the bad-conduct discharge, sheriff's deputies went to his home to check out the domestic violence complaint involving him and his then-girlfriend. People in the house said there was no problem, and no arrests were made. Kelley married the girlfriend two months later.

Also in 2014, he was charged with misdemeanor animal cruelty in Colorado after a neighbor reported him for beating a dog. Kelley initially refused to speak with officers about the incident. He denied abusing the animal but complied with an order to pay almost $370 in restitution. He was also the focus of a protective order issued in Colorado in 2015.

Kelley lived in New Braunfels, about 35 miles (55 kilometers) north of the church, and had recently started a job as an unarmed security guard at a nearby resort.

As he left the church, the shooter was confronted by an armed resident — later identified as Stephen Willeford — who had grabbed his own rifle and exchanged fire with Kelley.

Willeford had help from another local resident, Johnnie Langendorff, who said he was driving past the church as the shooting happened. The armed resident asked to get in Langendorff's truck, and the pair followed as the gunman drove away.

"He jumped in my truck and said, 'He just shot up the church. We need to go get him.' And I said 'Let's go,'" Langendorff said.

The pursuit reached speeds up to 90 mph (145 kph). Willeford told Arkansas TV stations KHBS/KHOG that he kept a 911 operator advised of the situation during the chase. The gunman eventually lost control of his vehicle and crashed.

Willeford walked up to the vehicle with his gun drawn, and the attacker did not move. Police arrived about five minutes later, Langendorff said.

The assailant was dead in his vehicle. He had three gunshot wounds — two from where the armed man hit him in the leg and the torso and the third self-inflicted wound to the head, authorities said.

"There was no thinking about it. There was just doing. That was the key to all this. Act now. Ask questions later," Langendorff said.


Categories: Latest News

Gunman checked each aisle, shot babies at point-blank range

PoliceOne - Tue, 11/07/2017 - 09:55

By Jim Vertuno, Will Weissert and Paul J. Weber Associated Press

SUTHERLAND SPRINGS, Texas — The gunman who killed 26 people at a small-town Texas church went aisle to aisle looking for victims and shot crying babies at point-blank range, a couple who survived the attack said.

Rosanne Solis and Joaquin Ramirez were sitting near the entrance to the First Baptist Church on Sunday when they heard what sounded like firecrackers and realized someone was shooting at the tiny wood-frame building.

In an interview with San Antonio television station KSAT, Solis said congregants began screaming and dropped to the floor. She could see bullets flying into the carpet and fellow worshippers falling down, bloodied, after getting hit.

For a moment, the attacked seemed to stop, and worshippers thought that police had arrived to confront the gunman. But then he entered the church and resumed "shooting hard" at helpless families, Solis said.

The gunman checked each aisle for more victims, including babies who cried out amid the noise and smoke, Ramirez said.

The couple survived by huddling close to the ground and playing dead. Solis was shot in the arm. Ramirez was hit by shrapnel.

About 20 other people were wounded. Investigators collected at least 15 empty magazines that held 30 rounds each at the scene, suggesting the assailant fired at least 450 rounds.

The gunman, Devin Patrick Kelley, had a history of domestic violence that spanned years before the attack and was able buy weapons because the Air Force did not submit his criminal history to the FBI as required by military rules.

If Kelley's past offenses had been properly shared, they would have prevented him from buying a gun, the Air Force acknowledged Monday.

Investigators also revealed that Kelley had sent threatening text messages to his mother-in-law, a member of the church, before the attack, and that sheriff's deputies had responded to a domestic violence call in 2014 at his home involving a girlfriend who became his second wife.

Later that year, he was formally ousted from the Air Force for a 2012 assault on his ex-wife in which he choked her and struck her son hard enough to fracture his skull.

At a news conference in South Korea, President Donald Trump was asked if he would support "extreme vetting" for gun purchases in the same way he has called for "extreme vetting" for people entering the country. Trump responded by saying stricter gun control measures might have led to more deaths in the shooting because a bystander who shot at the gunman would not have been armed.

"If he didn't have a gun, instead of having 26 dead, you would have had hundreds more dead," Trump said.

In the tiny town of Sutherland Springs, population 400, grieving townspeople reeled from their losses. The dead ranged from 18 months to 77 years old and included multiple members of some families.

"Our church was not comprised of members or parishioners. We were a very close family," said the pastor's wife Sherri Pomeroy, who, like her husband, was out of town when the attack happened. "Now most of our church family is gone."

The couple's 14-year-old daughter, Annabelle Pomeroy, was among those killed.

Kelley's mother-in-law sometimes attended services there, but the sheriff said she was not at church Sunday.

The massacre appeared to stem from a domestic situation and was not racially or religiously motivated, Texas Department of Public Safety Regional Director Freeman Martin said. He did not elaborate.

Based on evidence at the scene, investigators believe Kelley died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound after he was chased by bystanders, one of whom was armed, and crashed his car.

The 26-year-old shooter also used his cellphone to tell his father he had been shot and did not think he would survive, authorities said.

While in the military, Kelley served in logistics readiness at Holloman Air Force Base in New Mexico from 2010 until his 2014 discharge, Air Force spokeswoman Ann Stefanek said.

He was discharged for the assault involving his previous wife and her child and had served a year of confinement after a court-martial. Under Pentagon rules, information about convictions of military personnel for crimes such as assault should be submitted to the FBI's Criminal Justice Investigation Services Division.

Stefanek said the service is launching a review of its handling of the case and taking a comprehensive look at its databases to ensure other cases have been reported correctly.

A few months before he received the bad-conduct discharge, sheriff's deputies went to his home to check out the domestic violence complaint involving him and his then-girlfriend. People in the house said there was no problem, and no arrests were made. Kelley married the girlfriend two months later.

Also in 2014, he was charged with misdemeanor animal cruelty in Colorado after a neighbor reported him for beating a dog. Kelley initially refused to speak with officers about the incident. He denied abusing the animal but complied with an order to pay almost $370 in restitution. He was also the focus of a protective order issued in Colorado in 2015.

Kelley lived in New Braunfels, about 35 miles (55 kilometers) north of the church, and had recently started a job as an unarmed security guard at a nearby resort.

As he left the church, the shooter was confronted by an armed resident — later identified as Stephen Willeford — who had grabbed his own rifle and exchanged fire with Kelley.

Willeford had help from another local resident, Johnnie Langendorff, who said he was driving past the church as the shooting happened. The armed resident asked to get in Langendorff's truck, and the pair followed as the gunman drove away.

"He jumped in my truck and said, 'He just shot up the church. We need to go get him.' And I said 'Let's go,'" Langendorff said.

The pursuit reached speeds up to 90 mph (145 kph). Willeford told Arkansas TV stations KHBS/KHOG that he kept a 911 operator advised of the situation during the chase. The gunman eventually lost control of his vehicle and crashed.

Willeford walked up to the vehicle with his gun drawn, and the attacker did not move. Police arrived about five minutes later, Langendorff said.

The assailant was dead in his vehicle. He had three gunshot wounds — two from where the armed man hit him in the leg and the torso and the third self-inflicted wound to the head, authorities said.

"There was no thinking about it. There was just doing. That was the key to all this. Act now. Ask questions later," Langendorff said.


Categories: Latest News

Pa. trooper shot during traffic stop

PoliceOne - Tue, 11/07/2017 - 09:39

Associated Press

NAZARETH, Pa. — A Pennsylvania State Police trooper has been shot during a traffic stop, and a suspect is believed to be in custody.

State police say the trooper was shot Tuesday on state Route 191 in Plainfield Township, Northampton County, about 65 miles north of Philadelphia.

The trooper's condition was not immediately known.

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State Police Corporal Shot During Traffic Stop Plainfield Township, PA – A Pennsylvania State Police corporal was shot...

Posted by PA State Police on Tuesday, November 7, 2017

Citing emergency radio reports, local media reported the suspect is in custody at Easton Hospital. Asked to confirm, Northampton County District Attorney John Morganelli told The Associated Press, "I believe that to be the case."

There's a heavy police presence at the hospital. A car with its back window shot out that matches the description of the suspect's car is in the parking lot, marked with police tape.

Gov. Tom Wolf tweeted that he is "praying for this trooper and their family."

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BREAKING: Pennsylvania State Police said a trooper was shot during a traffic stop. An ambulance is now transporting the trooper to a hospital. LATEST: http://bit.ly/2m2iswk Courtesy: WTXF

Posted by FOX 13 News - Tampa Bay on Tuesday, November 7, 2017


Categories: Latest News

Autopsy shows Ill. officer died of blunt force trauma

PoliceOne - Tue, 11/07/2017 - 09:20

Associated Press

ROCKFORD, Ill. — Autopsies have revealed that a northern Illinois police officer died of blunt force trauma and a pickup driver was shot to death during an early morning traffic stop.

A spokeswoman for the city of Rockford says 30-year-old officer Jaimie Cox's injuries may have been caused when the pickup crashed.

A separate autopsy shows that 49-year old Eddie Patterson Jr., is believed to have been shot by Cox. Patterson also was injured when the pickup crashed about 1 a.m. Sunday.

State police Sgt. Sam Thomas said Monday that Patterson's driver's license had been revoked and that Cox may have pulled him over after noticing license plates on the pickup "didn't match the vehicle."

Cox was found near the truck and pronounced dead at a hospital. Patterson's body was inside the truck.

Visitation is scheduled from 3-9 p.m. on Friday at First Free Evangelical Church for Cox, the city of Rockford said in a news release. A police funeral service will start at 10 a.m. on Saturday at the church.


Categories: Latest News

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